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What You Shouldn't Say During a Job Interview

There are many things you shouldn’t say during a job interview. You need to concentrate on displaying and selling your skills and qualifications. That’s what the interviewer is interested in. In addition, there is a professional way to go about interviewing. Some things are not appropriate to say in any interview.

Any of the following statements might end your chances of getting the job.

1. “I really hate my job.”

There are several problems with this statement. First, it’s unprofessional to show such strong emotions about a job during a job interview. Again, interviewers are interested in what you can do for their company, not what you feel about your current one. Vent to your friends and family, if necessary, but not to an interviewer. 

Second, your interviewer will be concerned about this statement if you give it as an answer to why you want the job you’re interviewing for. You need to want the job for a positive reason and the contributions you can make, not because you’re fleeing something you hate.

Third, any interviewer will be worried you’re a negative person. Even if you’re qualified, you could lose your chance because they worry you’ll be a negative influence.

2. “I really need this job.”

Even if you really need the money or are about to lose your current job, don’t utter this! Again, an interviewer is not a time for unvarnished truth about your personal life. The employer wants to know how your skills and qualifications fit the job. 

It’s also putting pressure on the company to respond to your needs rather than focusing on your ability to respond to theirs.

3. “I really hate my boss (or company).”

Never bad-mouth your boss or employer, current or former. The interviewer will see it as a sign you will do that to bosses and companies going forward. They won’t want you to do that to them. 

If you are leaving because of a personal conflict, performance issue or lack of promotional opportunities, say “I’m looking for a position with more opportunity to use my skills and qualifications.” That’s true. It gives the situation a positive cast, and doesn’t bring personal emotion into it.

4. “How much will I be paid?”

While there is a time and place to discuss your compensation, it isn’t during the initial interview stage. a general rule of thumb for the job search is to never be the first person to bring up money.  

Compensation is discussed only when companies are narrowing down the search and seriously thinking of making an offer. The company will bring it up, and negotiations begin then.

5. “Can I go on vacation in May (or any other month)?”

Bringing up a vacation makes it sound like vacation is too much on your mind. The position and its work should be front and center, not when you’re going to Bermuda. 

Second, you may name a month where workflow or deadlines are very heavy in the company. The idea you may not be there will be enough to end any job offer.

Third, if you already have a vacation planned for a certain month, discuss it once they make an offer, not in the initial interviews.

Present your skills and qualifications in a job interview, not these five statements!

For more great interview tips, contact the staffing professionals at Nesco Resource today!

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